A list of sources follows for reporters and correspondents doing stories about breaching dams on the lower Snake River, covering issues of global warming or gathering information on the politics of salmon restoration in the Pacific Northwest.  The sources listed have a point of view but they are committed to telling the truth, using facts and figures and respecting competing views.  They are knowledgeable, responsible and accessible.   We are providing names, e-mail addresses and when available phone numbers and urge you to call or write.

Rachel Carbary

435-583-7271

Expertise:

Wild and Captive Orcas, Activism

Rachel Carbary is an ocean and marine life enthusiast with a BS in Environmental Science & Resource Management from the Univ of Washington. She created a worldwide campaign called Empty the Tanks in 2013 focused on ending dolphin & whale captivity, while also promoting the health of our oceans. This annual campaign event has since become the largest global event against captivity in history. Rachel began working for Ric O'Barry's Dolphin Project in 2019.

Personal Statement: I was 30 years old when I saw an orca for the first time. It was a member of one of the Southern Resident Killer Whales, and I was in awe of their beauty and strength. Our state is privileged with being home to this iconic species and I believe that we must act now in order to save them.

Ed Chaney

208-939-0714

Expertise:

Snake River Dams, Salmon, Government Agencies

Ed Chaney has a half century of professional experience in natural resource management, advisory to government agencies, governors, tribes and served on councils and commissions in the PNW. He was Information Director for the National Wildlife Federation in Washington, D.C. and provided expert testimony before governmental bodies, including committees of the United States Congress. He was interviewed by Leslie Stahl on a 60 Minutes story: Fish Fuss re: Snake River Dams and Salmon. In 1968, Chaney was a whistle blower on the threats to salmon from dams and environmental degradation.

Debra Ellers

Expertise:

Southern Resident Orcas, Salmon

Debra K. Ellers is a retired attorney, who lives in Port Townsend, WA, where she dedicates her time to social and environmental justice work. Before retiring, Debra lived and worked as an attorney in Idaho for 30 years, handling complex litigation and business matters. Debra is a passionate advocate for Southern Resident Killer Whales and the chinook salmon on which the whales depend. She worked for conservation groups on a number of key environmental issues in Idaho, including declining wild salmon runs, wolf reintroduction, and public lands’ protection. Since the 1990s, Debra has advocated breaching the 4 Lower Snake River Dams, to benefit salmon, orcas, tribal rights and the regional economy.

Greg Haller

Expertise:

River Management

Greg Haller has experience on river basin management issues, including the development of the Nez Perce water rights settlement, hydropower operations in the Columbia River Basin, University of Idaho College of Law & Cornell University; environmental management and natural resource economics.

Steven Hawley

503-477-2134

Expertise:

Snake River Dams, Salmon, Southern Resident Orcas

Steven Hawley is co-producer of documentary film Dammed To Extinction, writer of Recovering a Lost River a book about the Snake that inspired the documentary film Dam Nation by Patagonia. He’s a senior correspondent for The Drake Magazine and recently had a book published by Patagonia.

Tony Jones

208-631-4334 208-344-0809

Expertise:

Energy Economics, Bonneville Power Administration

Tony Jones is the founder and principal at Rocky Mountain Econometrics. He’s dealt with a variety of energy related projects, including operational efficiencies of energy and transportation of the Columbia Basin, analysis of alternative-energy supply programs, electricity purchasing strategy analyses and authorship of electricity marketing programs and deregulation.

Scott Levy

208-450-9609

Expertise:

Historian, Information Advocate

Activist & volunteer, BS Mechanical Engineering UC Berkeley, filmmaker, adventurer, outdoor enthusiast. I have dedicated the last 23 years of my life studying the effects of Lower Snake River dams on our environment and the consequent climate change effects. Mitigation for their removal is easy. Repairing a collapsing ecosystem is not.

Heather Nicholson

Expertise:

Hydropower, Bonneville Power Administration

Heather is a cohabitant with the Southern Resident killer whales in the Salish Sea portion of their home, a constituent and electric cooperative co-owner. She is engaged with and utilizing all means at hand to promptly bring about conditions for these whales, associated lifeforms and ecosystems to thrive.

She enjoys in depth learning and communications with all who have a role in the present conditions and future of life on earth, which is… all.

Rod Sando

503-428-1072

Expertise:

Environmental Management & Government Policy

Rod Sando has served; in the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources and as Director of the DNR, Director of Idaho Fish and Game, and Executive Director of the Columbia Fish and Wildlife Authority.

Michelle Seidelman

503-929-6338

Expertise:

Southern Resident Orcas, Activism

Michelle Seidelman is a small business owner and the chapter coordinator for Sea Shepherd Conservation Society for the state of Oregon. She lives in the Metro Portland area where she has spent over a decade passionately advocating for the Southern Resident Killer Whales, Salmon, wolf habitat restoration and ending cetaceans in captivity. She ran a three year information/ protest campaign in front of the Army Corps of Engineers in Portland demanding the breaching of the 4 Lower Snake River Dams. She is a tireless leader for Earth Justice and Animal Rights.

Jim Waddell

360-775-7799

Expertise:

Snake River Dams, Dam Breaching

Jim Waddell is a Civil Engineer, U.S. Army Corps, retired. He served with the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Science Foundation. In 1999, he was deputy district engineer at the Walla Walla District when the Lower Snake Feasibility Study was in development.